A Dermal Therapist Answers All Of Your Acne Questions

Skin care application

Acne is one of the skin concerns that constantly pops up in our inbox. It's no surprise, really. Acne is really common and can be really tricky to handle. So, we’ve called on our trusted skin wizard, dermal therapist extraordinaire, Yadira Cauchi, to answer some of your most asked questions below. 

Why do I still get breakouts? I’m 34!
“Anyone can get breakouts at any time. It’s a common misconception that we grow out of it. When you’re an adult and you’re breaking out, most of the time it can be attributed to fluctuating hormones. Stress is also a big factor as when the level of acne-causing hormones increases, this stimulates oil glands that contribute to acne. 

If you’re not removing your makeup properly, using the wrong skin care products, have an underlying condition (such as PCOS), or are using certain medications that can also contribute too. If you’re concerned, book in a professional skin consultation or speak to your doctor.”

How do I get rid of dark spots after popping a pimple?
“My advice is to not pop the pimple in the first place. Those dark spots are called Post Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation (PIH) and are very common in Fitzpatrick skin types four and above. And, honestly, it’s hard to get rid of so if you know that you are prone to PIH then my advice is to refrain from popping and use a pimple patch. 

The best products/ingredients to treat PIH include: 

- SPF. This will prevent them from getting worse. 

- Vitamin C. A brightening antioxidant that helps protect [the skin]. 

- Vitamin B. An anti-inflammatory and helps regulate sebum production which is great for acne-prone skin. 

- Vitamin A. It’s bomb at everything and increases cellular turnover. 

- Glycolic Acid. My favourite chemical exfoliant to use when dealing with PIH.”

What’s the best way to deal with blind pimples?
“First, avoid trying to pop them. You can’t. It will definitely just make things worse or lead to scarring. In-clinic, LED is great for blind pimples. Pimple patches can help, as can exfoliating gently with a BHA like salicylic acid. 

A lot of the time you do need to let them run their course, however if they are consistently bothering you it’s best to chat to your doctor or book in to see a Dermatologist.”

Any advice for hormonal pimples?
“Often hormonal acne breakouts are unavoidable. You need to address the underlying issues that are leading to your hormonal acne in order for it to go away. If you get them during the week of your period, use a salicylic acid wash on the areas most prone to them the week before. This can help prevent/minimise them from popping up. LED treatments in-clinic are also great at calming inflammation. However if they are unmanageable or recurring, definitely chat to your doctor. Hormonal acne requires a multi-practitioner approach.” 

Why did I break out a little the day following a facial?
“When doing a lot of extractions, sometimes not all of the lodged oil will come out. And because we don't force anything that doesn't want to come out, some purging can occur a day or two after a facial and it’s very normal; often expected. 

Also, sometimes, if any of the products used were too heavy and the pores get clogged, then breakouts can happen. Your facialist should know how to keep ingredients lightweight if you are acne-prone.”

How can I soothe my maskne? Help! 
“Switching to a silk mask may be beneficial if you are experiencing any type of maskne breakouts. These tend to not aggravate the skin as much and promote better airflow. 

If you wear your mask all day long it may be beneficial to try a slightly richer moisturiser. This can help increase the skin’s protective barrier. Also, try not to go too crazy on your active ingredients in breakout areas. This may aggravate inflammation, and ultimately, can make things worse. And of course, it may help to wear less or even no makeup, if you can do that. Just focus makeup on the eyes, instead.”

Have a question that you want us to answer for you? Toss it below!

Leave a comment